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Best Oxycontin 80mg

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Oxycontin is a prescription-only pain-relieving tablet. It is an opioid (narcotic) medication used for severe chronic pain. This medication temporarily changes the way your body feels and responds to pain by tricking the brain. Oxycontin is an extended-release drug; meaning it is released into the bloodstream slowly over time. Oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets are the generic version of Oxycontin. An 80-mg tablet costs $65.00. You can use our WalGreen Oxycontin coupon to get a discount at participating pharmacies we ship to.

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Oxycontin 80mg

 

 

 

Oxycontin is a prescription-only pain-relieving tablet. It is an opioid (narcotic) medication used for severe chronic pain. This medication temporarily changes the way your body feels and responds to pain by tricking the brain. Oxycontin tablet is an extended-release drug; meaning it is released into the bloodstream slowly over time. Oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets are the generic version of Oxycontin pills. An 80mg tablet costs Dh30. You can use our  Oxycontin coupon to get a discount at participating pharmacies we ship to.

 

OxyContin 5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, 80 mg, 120 mg prolonged release tablets

How to Use (OxyContin) Oxycodone

  1. This medication is used to help relieve severe ongoing pain (such as due to cancer). Oxycodone belongs to a class of drugs known as opioid analgesics. It works in the brain to change how your body feels and responds to pain. The higher strengths of this drug (more than 40 milligrams per tablet) should be used only if you have been regularly taking moderate to large amounts of an opioid pain medication. These strengths may cause overdose (even death) if taken by a person who has not been regularly taking opioids. Do not use the extended-release form of oxycodone to relieve pain that is mild or that will go away in a few days. This medication is not for occasional (“as needed”) use.

Oxycontin reactions

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking extended-release oxycodone and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
Take this medication on a regular schedule as directed by your doctor, not as needed for sudden (breakthrough) pain. Take this drug with or without food, usually every 12 hours. If you have nausea, it may help to take this drug with food. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about other ways to decrease nausea (such as lying down for 1 to 2 hours with as little head movement as possible). If nausea persists, see your doctor.
Swallow the tablets whole. Do not break, crush, chew, or dissolve the tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of oxycodone overdose.

Conversion from oral morphine

Patients receiving oral morphine before OxyContin therapy should have their daily dose based on the following ratio: 10 mg of oral oxycodone is equivalent to 20 mg of oral morphine. It must be emphasised that this is a guide to the dose of OxyContin tablets required. Inter-patient variability requires that each patient is carefully titrated to the appropriate dose.

Transferring patients between oral and parenteral oxycodone

The dose should be based on the following ratio: 2 mg of oral oxycodone is equivalent to 1 mg of parenteral oxycodone. It must be emphasised that this is a guide to the dose required. Inter-patient variability requires that each patient is carefully titrated to the appropriate dose.

Elderly patients taking OxyContin

A dose adjustment is not usually necessary in elderly patients.

Controlled pharmacokinetic studies in elderly patients (aged over 65 years) have shown that, compared with younger adults, the clearance of oxycodone is only slightly reduced. No untoward adverse drug reactions were seen based on age, therefore adult doses and dosage intervals are appropriate.

Patients with renal or hepatic impairment

The plasma concentration in this population may be increased. The dose initiation should follow a conservative approach in these patients. The recommended adult starting dose should be reduced by 50% (for example a total daily dose of 10 mg orally in opioid naïve patients), and each patient should be titrated to adequate pain control according to their clinical situation.

Use in non-malignant pain

Opioids are not first-line therapy for chronic non-malignant pain, nor are they recommended as the only treatment. Types of chronic pain which have been shown to be alleviated by strong opioids include chronic osteoarthritic pain and intervertebral disc disease. The need for continued treatment in non-malignant pain should be assessed at regular intervals.

Method of administration

  • OxyContin tablets are for oral use.
  • OxyContintablets must be swallowed whole and not broken, chewed or crushed.
  • Duration of treatment
  • Oxycodone should not be used for longer than necessary.
  • Discontinuation of treatment
  • When a patient no longer requires therapy with oxycodone, it may be advisable to taper the dose gradually to prevent symptoms of withdrawal.

Warnings and precautions for use

Caution must be exercised when administering oxycodone to the debilitated elderly, patients with severely impaired pulmonary function, patients with impaired hepatic or renal function, patients with myxoedema, hypothyroidism, Addison’s disease, toxic psychosis, prostate hypertrophy, adrenocortical insufficiency, alcoholism, delirium tremens, diseases of the biliary tract, pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disorders, hypotension, hypovolaemia raised intracranial pressure, intracranial lesions, head injury (due to risk of increased intracranial pressure), reduced level of consciousness of uncertain origin, sleep apnoea or patients taking benzodiazepines, other CNS depressants (including alcohol) or MAO inhibitors.

Pregnancy

OxyContin tablets are not recommended for use in pregnancy nor during labour. There are limited data from the use of oxycodone in pregnant women. Regular use in pregnancy may cause drug dependence in the foetus, leading to withdrawal symptoms in the neonate. If opioid use is required for a prolonged period in pregnant women, advise the patient of the risk of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome and ensure that appropriate treatment will be available.

Administration during labour may depress respiration in the neonate and an antidote for the child should be readily available.

Breastfeeding

Administration to nursing women is not recommended as oxycodone may be secreted in breast milk and may cause respiratory depression in the infant.

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